Magnesium and Diabetes Papers

 

VR 1.0
PT J
AU Song, Y
He, K
Levitan, EB
Manson, JE
Liu, S
TI Effects of oral magnesium supplementation on glycemic control in type 2
diabetes mellitus: A meta-analysis of controlled clinical trials
SO DIABETES
LA English
DT Meeting Abstract
TC 0
PY 2005
VL 54
SU Suppl. 1
BP A130
EP A130
UT ISI:000229501300523
ER

PT J
AU Simsek, E
Karabay, M
Kocabay, K
TI Assessment of magnesium status in newly diagnosed diabetic children:
measurement of erythrocyte magnesium level and magnesium tolerance
testing
SO TURKISH JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS
LA English
DT Article
DE erythrocyte magnesium levels; type 1 diabetes; magnesium tolerance test
ID VITAMIN-D METABOLITES; MELLITUS; HYPOMAGNESEMIA; DEFICIENCY; PLASMA;
SERUM
AB The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between
serum, erythrocyte and urine magnesium levels and retained magnesium
percentage in newly diagnosed diabetic children. In a cross-sectional
study, 34 children with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and
21 healthy age- and sex-matched control subjects were screened for
their serum, erythrocyte, and urine magnesium levels. Magnesium
tolerance test was performed on diabetic and control subjects: Serum
and erythrocyte magnesium levels in diabetic children were
significantly lower than in healthy controls (plasma magnesium, p <
0.05; erythrocyte magnesium, p < 0.001); however, serum magnesium level
was in normal range in diabetics and controls. Erythrocyte magnesium
levels in diabetic children showed an inverse correlation with
percentage of retained magnesium load (r=-0.44, p < 0.01). Urine
magnesium excretion in diabetic children (7.12 +/- 2.18 mmol/g
creatinine/24-hr) was significantly higher than in healthy controls
(4.0 +/- 1.35 mmol/g creatinine/24-hr) (p < 0.001). There was a
negative correlation between erythrocyte magnesium (2.07 +/- 0.62
mmol/L) and urine magnesium (7.12 +/- 2.18 mmol/g creatinine/24-hr)
(r=-0.68 p < 0.01) in diabetic children. Magnesium tolerance test
showed that percentage of retained magnesium in diabetic children (66
+/- 26%) was significantly higher than in controls (16 +/- 7%) (p <
0.001). This study is the first study to simultaneously investigate
serum, erythrocyte and urine magnesium levels and magnesium tolerance
test in newly diagnosed diabetic children. In conclusion, erythrocyte
magnesium levels decrease earlier than serum magnesium in diabetic
children. The follow-up parameters in diabetics may include the policy
of monitoring magnesium status. Erythrocyte magnesium measurement is
preferred to serum magnesium. Magnesium tolerance test is a reliable
and sensitive method, which may be used as an alternative to
erythrocyte magnesium measurement or in combination with it in
hospitalized diabetic children.
TC 0
PD APR-JUN
PY 2005
VL 47
IS 2
BP 132
EP 137
UT ISI:000230607400006
ER

PT J
AU Romero, JR
Ferreira, A
Ricupero, DA
Rivera, A
TI Dysregulation of cellular magnesium homeostasis by glucose in type II
diabetic patients
SO AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HYPERTENSION
LA English
DT Meeting Abstract
DE diabetes; glucose; magnesium
TC 0
PD MAY
PY 2005
VL 18
IS 5
PN Part 2 Suppl. S
BP 166A
EP 166A
UT ISI:000229229600459
ER

PT J
AU Rodriguez-Hernandez, H
Gonzalez, JL
Rodriguez-Moran, M
Guerrero-Romero, F
TI Hypomagnesemia, insulin resistance, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis
in obese subjects
SO ARCHIVES OF MEDICAL RESEARCH
LA English
DT Article
DE magnesium; NASH; insulin resistance; steatohepatitis; hypomagnesemia;
type 2 diabetes; obesity
ID FATTY LIVER-DISEASE; SERUM MAGNESIUM LEVELS; MITOCHONDRIAL
ABNORMALITIES; METABOLIC SYNDROME; DIETARY MAGNESIUM; GLUCOSE;
ASSOCIATION; NASH; HOMEOSTASIS; PREVALENCE
AB Background. Epidemiological evidence shows a strong relationship
between decreased serum magnesium levels (DSML) and insulin resistance.
As nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) seems to be related to insulin
resistance, the aim of this study was to determine the potential
relationship between DSML and NASH in obese subjects.
Methods. We compared obese individuals with the diagnosis of diabetes,
insulin-resistance, and non-insulin resistance to a control group of
non-obese, non-insulin-resistant subjects. Participants were required
to have negative viral markers and negligible alcohol intake. Other
liver diseases and well-known causes for decreasing of magnesium were
exclusion criteria. A liver biopsy was performed in subjects with
aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferease (ALT)
levels >= 40 IU/mL.
Results. Of the 60 obese subjects, 20 were non-insulin resistant, 20
were insulin resistant, and 20 were type 2 diabetics. Twenty subjects
were in the control group. Eleven (33.3%) diabetics, 14 (42.4%)
insulin-resistant subjects, and 8 (24.2%) non-insulin-resistant
subjects underwent liver biopsies. Diagnosis of NASH was established in
29 (36.2%) individuals. Subjects with the diagnosis of NASH exhibited
lower serum magnesium levels of 1.7 +/- 0.2 mg/dL (0.70 +/- 0.08
mmol/L), and those with fibrosis showed the lowest serum magnesium
concentration at 1.5 +/- 0.3 mg/dL (0.62 +/- 0.12 mmol/L). Multiple
regression analysis adjusted by age showed that low serum magnesium
concentration was independently related to a high HOMA-IR index (OR
7.6, CI 95% 2.1-11.2; p <0.0001) and that a high HOMA-IR index was
related to NASH (OR 6.5, CI 95% 1.5-8.8; p <0.01). After adjusting for
age and a high HOMA-IR index, hypomagnesemia remained independently
related to NASH (OR 1.4, CI 95% 1.1-5.4; p <0.05).
Conclusions. The results of this study demonstrate an independent
relationship between DSML and NASH. (C) 2005 IMSS. Published by
Elsevier Inc.
TC 0
PD JUL-AUG
PY 2005
VL 36
IS 4
BP 362
EP 366
UT ISI:000230240800009
ER

PT J
AU Guerrero-Romero, F
Rodriguez-Moran, M
TI Complementary therapies for diabetes: The case for chromium, magnesium,
and antioxidants
SO ARCHIVES OF MEDICAL RESEARCH
LA English
DT Review
DE chromium; magnesium; vitamin E; alpha-tocopherol; lipoic acid;
antioxidants; micronutrients; type 2 diabetes
ID ALPHA-LIPOIC ACID; IMPROVES INSULIN SENSITIVITY;
LOW-DENSITY-LIPOPROTEIN; CONTROLLED-TRIAL ALADIN; PANCREATIC
BETA-CELLS; P-RECEPTOR INHIBITION; VITAMIN-E; OXIDATIVE STRESS;
GLUCOSE-TOLERANCE; GLYCEMIC CONTROL
AB A growing body of interest on the possible beneficial role of chromium,
magnesium, and antioxidant supplements in the treatment of diabetes has
contributed to debate about their value for reaching metabolic control
and to prevent chronic complications in diabetic subjects. In this
article we use a systematic approach focused on clinically based
evidence from clinical trials regarding the benefits of chromium,
magnesium, and antioxidant supplements as complementary therapies in
type 2 diabetes.
Chromium, magnesium, and antioxidants are essential elements involved
in the action of insulin and energetic metabolism, without serious
adverse effects. However, at present there is insufficient clinically
based evidence and its routine use in the treatment of type 2 diabetes
is still controversial.
Because the most frequent origin of deficiencies in micronutrients is
an inadequate diet, health care providers should invest more effort on
nutrition counseling rather than focusing on micronutrient
supplementation in order to reach metabolic control of their patients.
Results from long-term trials are needed in order to assess the safety
and beneficial role of chromium, magnesium, and antioxidant supplements
as complementary therapies in the management of type 2 diabetes. (c)
2005 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc.
TC 0
PD MAY-JUN
PY 2005
VL 36
IS 3
BP 250
EP 257
UT ISI:000230038000008
ER

PT J
AU Pham, PCT
Pham, PMT
Pham, PAT
Pham, SV
Pham, HV
Miller, JM
Yanagawa, N
Pham, PTT
TI Lower serum magnesium levels are associated with more rapid decline of
renal function in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2
SO CLINICAL NEPHROLOGY
LA English
DT Article
DE magnesium; diabetes mellitus type 2; kidney; progression
ID BLOOD-PRESSURE; PRIMARY-CARE; DEFICIENCY; HYPOMAGNESEMIA; CELLS; RISK;
RETINOPATHY; APOPTOSIS; IDDM; SUPPLEMENTATION
AB Aims: Hypomagnesemia has been implicated in adversely affecting
diabetic complications. This is a retrospective study designed to
determine whether there is any association between serum magnesium
concentration [Mg2+] and the rate of renal function deterioration, as
determined by the slope of serum creatinine reciprocals versus time
(1/SCr-vs-t), in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2).
Materials and methods: DM2 patients without known kidney disease seen
at Olive View-UCLA Medical Center for any reason during January-March
2001 were included. For each patient, all available data from our
electronic database for [Mg2+], hemoglobin A(1C) (HbA(1C)), serum
creatinine (SCr), lipid profiles, routine urinary analysis, as well as
history of hypertension and pharmacy profiles were retrieved. The
average of all parameters obtained and linear regression analyses for
the slope of 1/SCr-vs-t plot were performed for each patient. Patients
were stratified by gender and divided into four groups based on
increasing [Mg2+]. Correlations between each parameter including the
slope of 1/SCr-vs-t and the four magnesium groups were analyzed.
Results: 252 males and 298 females with a mean follow-up of 62.6
&PLUSMN; 22.5 months were included. Patients belonging to lower [Mg2+]
groups for both genders had significantly worse slopes of 1/SCr-vs-t
plot independent of the presence of hypertension and use of ACEI/ARB,
diuretics, HMG-CoA enzyme inhibitors or aspirin. In a multivariate
regression analysis controlling for age, HbA(1C) and various components
of the lipid profile, [Mg2+] remained an independent predictor for the
slope of 1/SCr-vs-t. A trend for worse proteinuria based on routine
urinary analysis was observed among patients belonging to the lowest
[Mg2+] group. Conclusions: Lower [Mg2+] is associated with a faster
renal function deterioration rate in DM2 patients.
TC 0
PD JUN
PY 2005
VL 63
IS 6
BP 429
EP 436
UT ISI:000229555100003
ER

PT J
AU Schulze, MB
Hu, FB
TI Primary prevention of diabetes: What can be done and how much can be
prevented?
SO ANNUAL REVIEW OF PUBLIC HEALTH
LA English
DT Review
ID IMPAIRED GLUCOSE-TOLERANCE; CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE; TIME
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY; BODY-FAT DISTRIBUTION; DIETARY FIBER INTAKE;
MIDDLE-AGED WOMEN; MODERATE ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION; IMPROVES INSULIN
SENSITIVITY; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL; FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP
AB Although it is widely believed that type 2 diabetes mellitus is the
result of a complex interplay between genetic and environmental
factors, compelling evidence from epidemiologic studies indicates that
the current worldwide diabetes epidemic is largely due to changes in
diet and lifestyle. Prospective cohort studies and randomized clinical
trials have demonstrated that type 2 diabetes can be prevented largely
through moderate diet and lifestyle modifications. Excess adiposity is
the most important risk factor for diabetes, and thus, maintaining a
healthy body weight and avoiding weight gain during adulthood is the
cornerstone of diabetes prevention. Increasing physical activity and
reducing sedentary behaviors such as prolonged TV watching are
important both for maintaining body weight and improving insulin
sensitivity. There is increasing evidence that the quality of fat and
carbohydrate plays a more important role than does the quantity, and
thus, public health strategies should emphasize replacing saturated and
trans fats with unsaturated fats and replacing refined grain products
with whole grains. Recent studies have also suggested a potential role
for coffee, dairy, nuts, magnesium, and calcium in preventing diabetes.
Overall, a healthy diet, together with regular physical activity,
maintenance of a healthy weight, moderate alcohol consumption, and
avoidance of sedentary behaviors and smoking, could nearly eliminate
type 2 diabetes. However, there is still a wide gap between what we
know and what we practice in the field of public health; how to narrow
that gap remains a major public health challenge.
TC 0
PY 2005
VL 26
BP 445
EP 467
UT ISI:000228981500020
ER

PT J
AU Huerta, MG
Roemmich, JN
Kington, ML
Bovbjerg, VE
Weltman, AL
Holmes, VF
Patrie, JT
Rogol, AD
Nadler, JL
TI Magnesium deficiency is associated with insulin resistance in obese
children
SO DIABETES CARE
LA English
DT Article
ID FOOD FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE; INTRACELLULAR FREE MAGNESIUM; DIETARY
MAGNESIUM; GLUCOSE-METABOLISM; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY; ADOLESCENTS; WOMEN;
VALIDATION; SERUM; RISK
AB OBJECTIVE – Magnesium deficiency has been associated with insulin
resistance (IR) and increased risk for type 2 diabetes in adults. This
study was designed to determine whether obese children exhibit serum or
dietary magnesium deficiency and its potential association with IR.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS – We studied 24 obese nondiabetic children
(BMI >= 85th percentile) and 24 sex- and puberty-matched lean control
subjects (BMI < 85th percentile). We measured serum magnesium, indexes
of insulin sensitivity, dietary magnesium intake (using a food
frequency questionnaire), and body composition (by air displacement
plethysmography).
RESULTS – Serum magnesium was significantly lower in obese children
(0.748 +/- 0.015 mmol/l, means +/- SE) compared with lean children
(0.801 +/- 0.012 mmol/l) (P = 0.009). Serum magnesium was inversely
correlated with fasting insulin (r(S) = 0.36 [95% CI -0.59 to -0.08]; 0
P = 0.011) and positively correlated with quantitative insulin
sensitivity check index (QUICKI) (0.35 [0.06-0.58]; P = 0.015). Dietary
magnesium intake was significantly lower in obese children (obese: 0.12
+/- 0.004 vs. lean: 0.14 +/- 0.004 mg/kcal; P = 0.003). Dietary
magnesium intake was inversely associated with fasting insulin (-0.43
[-0.64 to -0.16], P = 0.002) and directly correlated with QUICKI (0.43
[0.16-0.64]; P = 0.002).
CONCLUSIONS – The association between magnesium deficiency and IR is
present during childhood. Serum magonesium deficiency in obese children
may be secondary to decreased dietary magnesium intake. Magnesium
supplementation or increased intake of magnesium-rich foods may be an
important tool in the prevention of type 2 diabetes in obese children.
TC 0
PD MAY
PY 2005
VL 28
IS 5
BP 1175
EP 1181
UT ISI:000228701100030
ER

PT J
AU Hodge, AM
English, DR
O’Dea, K
Giles, GG
TI Glycemic index and dietary fiber and the risk of type 2 diabetes
SO DIABETES CARE
LA English
DT Article
ID IMPAIRED GLUCOSE-TOLERANCE; WHOLE-GRAIN INTAKE; MAGNESIUM INTAKE;
LIFE-STYLE; WOMEN; INSULIN; MELLITUS; LOAD; PREVENTION; MEN
AB OBJECTIVE- To examine associations between type 2 diabetes and fiber,
glycemic load (GL), dietary glycemic index (GI), and fiber-rich foods.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS- This was a prospective study of 36,787 men
and women aged 40-69 years without diabetes. For all self-reported
cases of diabetes at 4-year follow-up, confirmation of diagnosis was
sought from medical practitioners. Case subjects were those who
reported diabetes at follow-up and for whom there was no evidence that
they did not have type 2 diabetes. Data were analyzed with logistic
regression, adjusting for country of birth, physical activity, family
history of diabetes, alcohol and energy intake, education, 5-year
weight change, sex, and age.
RESULTS- Follow-up was completed by 31,641 (86%) participants, and 365
cases were identified. The odds ratio (OR) for the highest quartile of
white bread intake compared with the lowest was 1.37 (95% CI 1.04-1.81;
P for trend = 0.001). Intakes of carbohydrate (OR per 200 g/day 0.58,
0.36-0.95), sugars (OR per 100 g/day 0.61, 0.47-0.79), and magnesium
(OR per 500 mg/day 0.62, 0.43-0.90) were inversely associated with
incidence of diabetes, whereas intake of starch (OR per 100 g/day 1.47,
1.06-2.05) and dietary GI (OR per 10 units 1.32, 1.05-1.66) were
positively associated with diabetes. These relationships were
attenuated after adjustment for BMI and waist-to-hip ratio.
CONCLUSIONS- Reducing dietary GI while maintaining a high carbohydrate
intake may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. One way to achieve this
would be to substitute white bread with low-GI breads.
TC 2
PD NOV
PY 2004
VL 27
IS 11
BP 2701
EP 2706
UT ISI:000224825800021
ER

PT J
AU Yokota, K
Kato, M
Lister, F
Li, H
Hayakawa, T
Kikuta, T
Kageyama, S
Tajima, N
TI Clinical efficacy of magnesium supplementation in patients with type 2
diabetes
SO JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE OF NUTRITION
LA English
DT Article
DE magnesium supplementation; type 2 diabetes mellitus; hypertension;
insulin-resistance; hypertriglyceridemia; life style-related diseases
ID BLOOD-PRESSURE; INSULIN-RESISTANCE; MELLITUS
AB Effects of magnesium (Mg) supplementation on nine mild type 2 diabetic
patients with stable glycemic control were investigated. Water from a
salt lake with a high natural Mg content (7.1%) (MAG21) was used for
supplementation after dilution with distilled water to 100mg/100mL;
300mL/day was given for 30 days. Fasting serum immunoreactive insulin
level decreased significantly, as did HOMAsquareR (both p < 0.05).
There was also a marked decrease of the mean triglyceride level after
supplementation. The patients with hypertension showed significant
reduction of systolic (p < 0.01), diastolic (p = 0.0038), and mean (p <
0.01) blood pressure. The salt lake water supplement, MAG21, exerted
clinical benefit as a Mg supplement in patients with mild type 2
diabetes mellitus.
TC 1
PD OCT
PY 2004
VL 23
IS 5
BP 506S
EP 509S
UT ISI:000224531900011

PT J
AU Stalnikowicz, R
TI The significance of routine serum magnesium determination in the ED
SO AMERICAN JOURNAL OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE
LA English
DT Article
DE magnesium; ED
ID ACUTE MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION; PARATHYROID-HORMONE; HEART-DISEASE;
HYPOMAGNESEMIA; DEFICIENCY; PREGNANCY; POTASSIUM
AB To determine the significance of routine serum magnesium determination
in the ED, a retrospective analysis was done on 253 patients in whom
serum magnesium levels were examined in the department of EM. Mild,
moderate, and severe hypomagnesemia was found in 19.5%, 9.1%, and 2.5%
of the study population, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that
pregnancy and pregnancy-related conditions, diabetes mellitus, gender,
renal function, infectious diseases, and the presence of ischemic heart
disease were associated with low serum magnesium levels. In
multivariate analysis, only pregnancy and pregnancy-related conditions
(odds ratio [OR], 4.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-15.3) and
diabetes mellitus (OR, 9.04, 95% CI, 3.3-24.75) were significantly
associated with low serum magnesium levels. The number of patients
admitted to the hospital and the number of patients who died was not
statistically significantly different between the groups of patients
with normal serum magnesium levels as compared with those with low
serum magnesium levels. Although hypomagnesemia was found in 31% of the
study population, its clinical significance is not clear given the
absence of hypomagnesemia-related complications and death. ((C) 2003
Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.)
TC 2
PD SEP
PY 2003
VL 21
IS 5
BP 444
EP 447
UT ISI:000185775900008
ER

PT J
AU Hans, CP
Sialy, R
Bansal, DD
TI Magnesium deficiency and diabetes mellitus
SO CURRENT SCIENCE
LA English
DT Review
ID NUCLEAR-MAGNETIC-RESONANCE; RED-BLOOD-CELLS; INSULIN-RESISTANCE;
DIETARY MAGNESIUM; RENAL MAGNESIUM; HYPERTENSIVE SUBJECTS;
GLUCOSE-METABOLISM; ELDERLY SUBJECTS; ATPASE ACTIVITY; VITAMIN-E
AB Magnesium, the second most common intracellular cation plays a
fundamental role as a cofactor in various enzymatic reactions involving
energy metabolism. Magnesium is a cofactor in the glucose-transporting
mechanism of the cell membrane and various enzymes in carbohydrate
oxidation. It is also involved at multiple levels in insulin secretion,
binding and activity. The almost universal involvement of magnesium in
a wide variety of cellular processes critical to glucose metabolism,
insulin action and cardiovascular functions has been well appreciated.
The incidence of subclinical magnesium deficiency is common in diabetes
and cardiovascular disorders. However, limited attention has been drawn
to the impact of magnesium deficiency on late diabetic complications,
including cardiovascular disorders. Magnesium deficiency has recently
been related with age-related diseases through free-radical mechanism.
The existence of oxidative stress has been well documented in diabetes
and late diabetic complications.
The present review discusses the functional role of magnesium in the
pathogenesis of diabetes and introduces a relatively new concept on the
implication of magnesium deficiency in diabetic complications.
TC 0
PD DEC 25
PY 2002
VL 83
IS 12
BP 1456
EP 1463
UT ISI:000180238800013
ER

PT J
AU Djurhuus, MS
Klitgaard, NAH
Pedersen, KK
Blaabjerg, O
Altura, BM
Altura, BT
Henriksen, JE
TI Magnesium reduces insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and serum lipid
concentrations in type 1 diabetes
SO METABOLISM-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL
LA English
DT Article
ID URINARY MAGNESIUM; METABOLIC CONTROL; HEART-DISEASE; DOUBLE-BLIND;
MELLITUS; SUPPLEMENTATION; HOMEOSTASIS; PARAMETERS; POTASSIUM; THERAPY
AB A magnesium (Mg) deficit has been described in patients with type 1
diabetes, and it has been related to the development of cardiovascular
disease. We tested the hypothesis that type 1 diabetic patients have
deficits in dietary Mg intake and that proper long-term (24 weeks) oral
Mg supplementation would reduce cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore,
the Mg status, dietary Mg intake, and the effect of Mg supplementation
were evaluated in 10 type 1 diabetic patients and 5 control subjects.
Muscle Mg content was decreased by 7% in the type 1 diabetic patients,
and it increased by 5% after 24 weeks of oral MgO supplementation.
Acute and chronic Mg supplementation decreased serum total cholesterol,
serum low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B.
Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake decreased by 35% after 24 weeks of
oral MgO supplementation. Eight of 10 patients with type 1 diabetes had
a daily intake of Mg below 90% of the recommended daily allowance. In
conclusion, a Mg deficit was found in type 1 diabetic patients. The
deficit might be due partly to a relatively Mg-deficient diet. Mg
repletion was associated with a decrease in atherogenic lipid fractions
and a reduced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Copyright (C) 2001 by
W.B. Saunders Company.
TC 13
PD DEC
PY 2001
VL 50
IS 12
BP 1409
EP 1417
UT ISI:000172632600006
ER

PT J
AU Djurhuus, MS
TI New data on the mechanisms of hypermagnesuria in type I diabetes
mellitus
SO MAGNESIUM RESEARCH
LA English
DT Article
DE hyperglycaemia; hyperinsulinaemia; kidney; renal
ID RENAL MAGNESIUM EXCRETION; ISCHEMIC HEART-DISEASE; URINARY MAGNESIUM;
INSULIN RESISTANCE; DIETARY MAGNESIUM; SERUM; CHILDREN;
SUPPLEMENTATION; HYPOMAGNESEMIA; HYPERTENSION
AB It has been known for long that renal Mg excretion is increased in
patients with type I diabetes mellitus, and that these patients have a
Mg deficit. It can be hypothesized, that this deficit might be related
to the development of late complications in the diabetic.
In recent years it has been shown that the increased renal Mg excretion
in patients with type I diabetes is due primarily to an elevated plasma
glucose concentration. An increase in plasma glucose concentration from
5 to 12 mmol/l more than doubles renal Mg excretion, if everything else
is kept constant. Hyperinsulinism may also contribute to the increased
renal Mg excretion. However, since improved metabolic control in
patients with type I diabetes reduces the renal Mg loss despite an
increase in insulin dosage, hyperinsulinism. is probably of minor
importance in the aetiology of hypermagnesuria in patients with type I
diabetes mellitus, compared with the effect of hyperglycaemia.
TC 2
PD SEP
PY 2001
VL 14
IS 3
BP 217
EP 223
UT ISI:000171451300007
ER

PT J
AU Schildheuer, M
Bauer, A
Rob, PM
TI Magnesium and diabetes mellitus: epidemiological, clinical and
experimental data
SO MAGNESIUM-BULLETIN
LA German
DT Article
ID INSULIN; HYPERTENSION; DISEASE
AB In 1980, the relationship between diabetes mellitus and low serum
magnesium levels was reported for the first time in this journal.
Today, there is an increasing body of experimental and clinical data
covering this topic. In addition, there are epidemiological data
showing the negative impact of serum magnesium values in the lower
range of the reference interval upon e.g. atherosclerosis and
osteoporosis. And there are experimental data giving evidence to the
hypothesis that magnesium supplementation may protect from diabetes
late complications. The paper will review the aforementioned
informations and will present original data obtained from diabetic
inpatients with a bad metabolic control. Our findings confirm that
there is hypomagnesemia in diabetics, but we have found magnesium
deficiency, too. This may be related not only to the insufficient
magnesium intake, but also to an inadaequate hypermagnesuria, which
significantly was related to urinary osmolality and glucosuria. Based
on the given findings, the authors recommend an oral magnesium
supplementation in all diabetics with an underoptimal metabolic
control, even in case of low normal serum magnesium values.
TC 0
PY 2000
VL 22
IS 4
BP 83
EP 86
UT ISI:000166474700001
ER